Depressing Finland
I don't remember where it originated, but "pöhnä" is a state of being where your brain and body are not quite functioning properly and you don't really feel like doing anything. Inconvenience is usually attached to pöhnä, but it can also mean a pleasant fuzziness of the senses, e.g. after eating, having a few drinks or going to the sauna.

Also there’s the “lääkepöhnä”, medicine-pöhnä which causes that inconvenienced version of “pöhnä”. It’s something that you could have by, for example, taking allergy medicine that keep you tired 24/7 or be just really drugged up.

in my family we have always said "tutii" instead of good night. I have absolutely no idea why and where that word comes from.
Anonymous

From my understanding “tuuti” means putting a little child to sleep and “tutiminen” is little child’s sleeping. 

Finnish name for lullaby is “tuutulaulu” and many lullabies are about “tuutiminen” or have the little phrase “tuuti-lullaa” in them.

Here’s one: http://youtu.be/kYZIAUUV_44

In my family the word "örnöttää" is used when you're doing nothing and just staring into emptiness thinking about what ever comes to your mind. It's not so intentional to örnöttää but it's an enjoyable state of being.

It kinda have the same base tone in it, doesn’t it? Doing nothing and minding your own business.

I also remembered another word: Möhmöttää (or möhnöttää), it’s almost the same as “röhnöttää”, but instead of doing it because you’re lazy you do it for the sake of being comfortable and warm and cozy.

A list of Finnish words that tell you something about Finnish culture

acebutt:

- Kekkuloida = to prance or just hang around naked (yes, the word includes the presumption that you are naked)

- Örveltää = to be really drunk and do whatever you do when you’re really drunk, like crawling in a ditch somewhere on all fours

- Perskärpänen (literally “ass fly”) = a person who keeps following you without you wanting them to

- Röhnöttää = to sit with a bad posture or lie around because you are bored, lazy, or tired 

- Paskahalvaus (literally “shit paralysis”) = the state of being really fucking scared or startled

- Änkyrä = a person who’s very reluctant to change their own, usually backwards and bigoted views

- Änkyröidä = a verb derived from the previous noun

- Raivoraitis (literally “rage sober”) = a person who never drinks alcohol and might be very passionate about it

- Yrmy = a person who’s always grumpy or angry

- Perskannikka (literally “ass end-of-a-loaf-of-bread”) = a slang word for “buttock”

- Vongata = to repeatedly and annoyingly ask for sex from someone who’s not interested (i.e. to be a Nice Guy)

- Könsikäs = a big, handsome, masculine man that you find attractive

- Puliukko = a man who spends most of his time wandering about drunk, smells bad, and might be homeless

Feel free to add to the list. :D

I’d add there one thing that’s common word in my family but I’m not sure about the others:

-Örnöttää = being alone in a very distant place such as a summer cottage, not wanting to anyone disturb and being really grumpy even thinking about the possibility of anyone to come visit you.

Is your friend moving to a new apartment? Do you want to give a proper Finnish housewarming gift?

Bring him/her a box of salt and a loaf of bread. That is a very traditional (but nowadays not-so-common) housewarming gift in Finland.

The message of the gift is to wish that by giving the salt and the bread the new house will never run out of food, and it will be preserved in any situation.

Salt and bread are also signs of trust, hospitality and welcoming as well as social cohesion.

So there’s a restaurant called “Sampo” in the city of Kuopio (Kauppakatu 13; would recommend if you like vendace) that has a theme of using the Savonian dialect in everything. The other, “English” side of the sign simply reads “Reserved” and this here site would not let me add both pictures of the sign, grrr.
To translate that (first into English, then into understandable Finnish):
"Someone already reserved this table, but we have other good tables as well!"
"Joku jo tämän pöydän ehti varata, mutta onhan meillä muitakin hyviä pöytiä!"
Should also be added that the restaurant serves a drink called “kännikala” (lit. “drunk fish”, meaning a really drunk person). I dared a friend to get the drink, as I don’t like alcohol myself but got curious of the name - turns out it’s a shot with a salted vendace in it.
— Fan submission, thanks whitemarinefeathers!

So there’s a restaurant called “Sampo” in the city of Kuopio (Kauppakatu 13; would recommend if you like vendace) that has a theme of using the Savonian dialect in everything. The other, “English” side of the sign simply reads “Reserved” and this here site would not let me add both pictures of the sign, grrr.

To translate that (first into English, then into understandable Finnish):

"Someone already reserved this table, but we have other good tables as well!"

"Joku jo tämän pöydän ehti varata, mutta onhan meillä muitakin hyviä pöytiä!"

Should also be added that the restaurant serves a drink called “kännikala” (lit. “drunk fish”, meaning a really drunk person). I dared a friend to get the drink, as I don’t like alcohol myself but got curious of the name - turns out it’s a shot with a salted vendace in it.

— Fan submission, thanks !

Photo source: Riemurasia.net
Can you help me translating ''Anna mun kaikki kestää?'' :D Thanks for the help!
Anonymous

It’s roughly translated that “Help me to get through all of this” or “give me strength”.

It’s a phrase you say when you come up with something extremely stupid or frustrating or anything you don’t like. It’s not something you say this when you’re really deeply miserable or depressed and are begging for help, no. It’s something you say when you can’t handle the stupidity of the specific situation.

For example, you’re shopping with your friend, you’ve been through millions of shops and you’re extremely tired and frustrated and your friend wants to go there, and there, and oh, there’s an interesting shop too. In that situation you could say “Anna mun kaikki kestää”.

Have you ever been wondering how does tar taste like?

If you ever visit Finland you have plenty of options to try it out. 

We have, for example

[EDIT:]

Random Finnish word: Hurme

Hurme means blood, it’s not a common word. Veri is used mostly when talking about blood in general. But some positive and even romantic words have a bit hurme-blood in them:

Hurmaava - Charming, enchanting
Hurmata - To seduce, charm

It could have been that back in the days Finns described the feeling of love literally to cause blood rushing and blushing… Which is quite cute.